+21
Oh Yeah!

Are you 21 years of age or older?

Drag Horizontal
No
Yes
London-style Porter
Style

British Porter

MALTS

Brown malt, Black malt, Crystal/caramel malt, Maris Otter, Golden promise

CHARACTER HOPS

UK Fuggle

YEAST

House ale strain

ORIGINAL GRAVITY

12.8 Plato (1.052)

FINAL GRAVITY

3.5 Plato (1.014)

ABV

5.0%

MEASURED IBU

35

London-style Porter

British Porter

A throwback porter, inspired by those produced in London at the turn of the 20th century.

Brown malt paired with judicious amounts of black malt creates the impression of roasted nuts, unsweetened cacao, and coffee in this chocolate-brown brew. UK Fuggle hops deliver their unmistakable cedar-like wood character, and a classic British yeast provides dark fruit complexity.

For 150 years, the drink of choice for London’s working class: this unapologetically robust beer was never intended for “polite society.”

bottle shot

Porter, with its long list of credentials, is arguably the most consequential style in beer history.

Porter was the world’s first industrially produced and globally distributed beer, and the most popular beer in England throughout most of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Since the very beginning, porter was considered the drink of the working class. It derived its name from the street and river “porters” of the 18th century, among whom it was particularly appreciated.

In terms of historical export beers, it is India Pale Ale that comes to mind for most; when ironically, more porter was exported to India than pale ale ever was! Pale ale was the drink of the gentry, while porter was popular with the troops.

No two ingredients are more closely intertwined with the history of porter than brown malt, used in the 18th century; and black patent malt, invented in 1817 and the worlds first modern drum-roasted specialty malt.

The creation of black malt rendered the less cost-efficient brown malt all but obsolete. Although the porter breweries of London were quick to embrace black malt, they were reluctant to completely abandon their beloved brown malt and continued to use it (albeit in modified form) into the 20th century.

#sipanddiscuss